Presbyterian College chaplain elected president of Presbyterian College Chaplains Association

The Rev. Rachel Parsons-Wells, PC’s director of Religious Life and Service, was recently elected president of the Presbyterian College Chaplains Association (PCCA).

Fellow chaplains serving Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) affiliated schools or Presbyterian pastors, who are chaplains at other private colleges, elected Parsons-Wells to the post in February at the annual PCCA Conference.
She will serve in the position for two years.

“Enormously Affirming”

“It is enormously affirming to be elected to a leadership position by other chaplains,” Parsons-Wells said. “The makeup at the conference in February was particularly cool because it included some long-serving chaplains who have been mentors for me, as well as a new group of millennial chaplains.”

Parsons-Wells has served on the executive board of PCCA for the last four years and as the vice president for the last two years. As the president of PCCA, she also sits on the Association of Presbyterian Colleges and Universities (APCU), a sister organization for presidents of PC(USA) affiliated schools.

She was confirmed as part of the APCU board at its March meeting.

Creating Mentoring Networks

“The relationship with the PCCA has enabled the Association of Presbyterian Colleges & Universities to focus more broadly on the institutional health of our members — both spiritually and operationally,” said Jeff Arnold, APCU executive director.

“Together, we’re working to create a rising tide that lifts all our boats in more meaningful, sustainable ways.”

As PCCA president, Parsons-Wells says mentoring pairs have been created from the annual conference, which is planned by the executive board. This, she says, will help maintain the support and resource connections created at the yearly event.

“Now we are working on connecting to new chaplains who were not at the conference, and chaplains who have not been involved before. Creating mentoring and resource networks is an important role,” she said. “Most schools only have one person serving as chaplain, so these networks are very important.”